So, You Want To Make a Baby via At-Home Insemination?

Making a baby as a lesbian couple is a minefield. There are no ‘early nights’ when it comes to trying, and sperm comes at a premium. Every couple will have their own hurdles, whether it’s money or who wants to conceive, but either way, it’s important that you educate yourself on this incredibly important journey you’re about to embark on.

When we first started trying over five years ago, the community we have today didn’t exist. A lot of the couples we followed either conceived or were conceiving via IUI or IVF, or they had travelled abroad, and whilst they’re all viable options when wanting to conceive, if you’re anything like us – where your funds are limited – it in turn lowers your chances of ever having a baby.

Even Lesbian magazines didn’t really discuss options outside of (expensive) fertility treatments! What we wanted was inclusive conception options, but all we found was exclusion!

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Visibility: Why We Do What We Do

Yesterday, I was invited to chat to Anna Foster of BBC Radio 5 Live about sperm donors and how there is now an increase in demand for them outside of the realms of the NHS. We talked about what we went through and what *should* be common practise when deciding to do at-home artificial insemination (AI).

It certainly wasn’t your average Monday and throughout the whole interview I was asking myself why on earth I was sharing such personal details about our son’t conception (legs up in the air and all). It was an experience, and whilst I was incredibly anxious about the whole thing I was driven by our story and getting it out there so that others out there could see some form of hope. That there are other options when it comes to conception.

If you would like to listen to the whole feature, you can skip through to 10:12 via the link above.
(I’m on at 39:00).

The main concern within the interview surrounded the regulation of certain Facebook groups where couples, usually Lesbian couples, can find sperm donors, and how risky this is. It also briefly explored how the NHS need to change their stance on when they offer support for same sex couples.

Basically, if the cost to have a baby wasn’t so high – then perhaps women wouldn’t be taking the risks to have a baby.

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