A How-To Guide to Being an LGBTQ Ally

This week has been a difficult one for the LGBTQ community, it’s been exhausting to say the least. If it wasn’t being  compared to a contagion, it was hearing someone tell me that I chose to be gay.

But the thing that probably broke the proverbial camel’s back, what’s hurt the most, is the disappearance of so many so-called “allies”.  It’s not that they’ve turned homophobic – far from it – it’s just that haven’t been a little absent during our time of need.

Definition of an Ally:

A straight ally or heterosexual ally is a heterosexual and cis-gender person who supports equal civil rights, gender equality, LGBT social movements, and challenges homophobia, biphobia and transphobia.

Continue reading

A Letter to Andrea Leadsom from a Two Mum Family.

Dear Andrea Leadsom,

I’m still angry.

Just like the contagion you compared me and my family to, your rancid words are still flowing through my veins. I would have written to you sooner, but the rage that spilled from my heart stopped the words from flowing. It burned like lava. Besides, someone else wrote it better.

To this day I still don’t know whether you understand the scale in which your words have hurt me and my community. An apology and retraction would go a long way right now, although I feel that the damage has already been done.

We know you’re not exactly an ally to minority groups, you have never voted on equal gay rights , you have never voted on allowing the marriage between same-sex couples, and you almost always voted against laws to promote equality and human rights (9 votes against and 3 absences!) – you must be so proud of your voting record – but how can you say that my son isn’t worthy of validation amongst his peers.

How do you sleep at night?

Continue reading

Feeding a Three Year Old: “Get Your Kids to Eat Anything” by Emily Leary [Gifted]

Since we first started weaning T at six months, meals times have actually been a pretty enjoyable experience – surprisingly. We’d heard horror stories of six month olds refusing meals, gagging or choking, or turning your living room into a work of abstract art. As they get older, I’d read about two year olds demanding their sandwiches cut into triangles and NOT squares or avoiding anything that’s coloured green. With T though, probably because we chose to follow a Baby-Led Weaning regime, this hasn’t been the case. T will generally give anything a go at least once and will always want what we’re eating if we’re out at a restaurant.

That being said, over the past year or so, T has become quite sensitive to certain textures. Foods such as cooked mushrooms and onions, roasted peppers, and leafy substances such as spinach (cooked or raw) and lettuces are things he’s likely to pick out of a meal. It’s a very odd turn of events, especially as he’ll happily the eat raw versions of some of these. Most of the time, it doesn’t bother me, as I know he’ll just pick it out and carry on with his dinner (thank the gods), but other times it can be quite stressful either trying to cut something up so small that he won’t notice or messing around finding all the mushrooms once he realises they’re in his dinner.

Just in the nick of time though, before it got out of hand, we received some help.

Continue reading

Days Out: The Tate Modern, London

Last week, we were invited to London for an event, but seeing as it was only for the morning we thought we’d make the most out of our day (and train ticket!) and remain in London for the rest of the day.

Sadly, Sharon had to head back to work for the afternoon after the event; leaving T and I to our own devices, so we decided to take advantage of this and take a quick train ride to The Tate Modern. This was going to be T’s first visit to the galley. I was so excited!

We don’t usually do many “firsts” without Sharon, but art is one of the few things Sharon and I differ on. It’s not to say she dislikes art, she just doesn’t get it. She can appreciate a good painting or photograph, but that’s as far as it goes. I, on the other hand, really enjoy the arts and feel that it’s an incredibly important subject for children to explore. In fact, the earlier the better.

What do you think?

Continue reading

The Moonlite Projector: Review [AD – Review]

Books are incredibly important in our house. Not only do they allow us to explore new worlds and meet new people, but they bring us together as a family. Not a day goes by when we don’t read T a book.

Bedtime is when we read most of our books; although I don’t begrudge T when he brings me a book after breakfast! When we’re settling down for the night, T will usually sneak 2-3 books to bed hoping we’ll read all three (we always do) and then ask for another. I love the fact that he finishes his day with a book – I often wonder whether his story continues in his dreams.

T is a complete book worm, and to celebrate World Book Day we were recently sent a new interactive reading experience: a Moonlite Projector.

Continue reading