LGBT History Month: Featured Family: The Legacy of Leo

This week, Jess from The Legacy of Leo has shared her thoughts on casual homophobia – something that is all too prevalent in today’s society – especially in schools – for LGBT History Month.

I’ve been following ‘The Legacy of Leo’ for quite some time, not just because they’re a rainbow family, but because they talk so openly and honestly about Miscarriage and Stillbirth – something which they have sadly experienced first hand. They also talk quite frankly about loss as a member of the LGBT Community, which they would describe as “being part of a small pond within a pond”.

Here’s their story, if you would like to read last weeks post, you can do so here.

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LGBT History Month: Featured Family: Kaye.

This week, as part of LGBT History Month, we’re listening to Kaye. If you would like to read last week’s story, you can do so here.

I’ve followed Kaye, their wife, and their son Silas online for quite some time now. Not only are they Potterheads, but our boys are around the same age (I think!). Plus, they lead a fascinating life on a small island where there was once only one gay bar on the island.

I will always cherish being able to see other families just like us.

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LGBT History Month: Featured Family: Daddy Papa & Me

This month is LGBT History Month, a time when I, personally, like to give thanks to those that paved the way so me and my family can live (somewhat) more openly, as well as increase visibility for my community. With this, I thought I’d re-visit a feature I did a few years ago where a few of my favourite rainbow families tell me their story for LGBT History Month.

Today, we hear a story from Chris & Ryan, aka Oliver’s Fathers, about their Surrogacy story. Please do give them a follow over on instagram – they really are a beautiful family.

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LGBT History Month: Why Our Son Will Never Be an Ally.

Last year, I started a fantastic new book by Frank Lowe called ‘Raised by Unicorns‘, which is a collection of stories by people with LGBTQ+ parents. It’s one of those books that I’ve really savoured as I simply don’t want it to end. It’s raw and unfiltered, and regardless of it’s audience, it teaches the reader about acceptance.

Before I get started, if you’d like to give it a read, you can find it here.

Over the past few weeks it’s made me laugh, it’s made me cry, it’s made me reflect, and it’s whilst I was reading one of the chapters that I started to think about T’s position within the LGBTQ+ community.

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Visibility: Why We Do What We Do

Yesterday, I was invited to chat to Anna Foster of BBC Radio 5 Live about sperm donors and how there is now an increase in demand for them outside of the realms of the NHS. We talked about what we went through and what *should* be common practise when deciding to do at-home artificial insemination (AI).

It certainly wasn’t your average Monday and throughout the whole interview I was asking myself why on earth I was sharing such personal details about our son’t conception (legs up in the air and all). It was an experience, and whilst I was incredibly anxious about the whole thing I was driven by our story and getting it out there so that others out there could see some form of hope. That there are other options when it comes to conception.

If you would like to listen to the whole feature, you can skip through to 10:12 via the link above.
(I’m on at 39:00).

The main concern within the interview surrounded the regulation of certain Facebook groups where couples, usually Lesbian couples, can find sperm donors, and how risky this is. It also briefly explored how the NHS need to change their stance on when they offer support for same sex couples.

Basically, if the cost to have a baby wasn’t so high – then perhaps women wouldn’t be taking the risks to have a baby.

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Brighton Pride 2018: Why Pride is still important.

Over the past thirty-something years, I’ve been ‘proud’ of many things. I was proud when I got a few A’s in my GCSE’s (I know, I was surprised, too), I was proud when I passed my driving test, I was proud when I lost a lot of weight whilst trying for a baby, and more recently, I was proud when I conquered my fear of open heights.

Pride isn’t just about being proud of yourself either, you can be proud of your friends, family, and colleagues. Your neighbours, your congregation, your country. Pride has so much power behind it. It can empower people and celebrate a community. There is nothing wrong with being proud, however when used in the wrong way it can blind one’s viewpoint.

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