T’s Reads: Book Advent Calendar 2018 – Week One

Following the fun we had from last year’s Book Advent, we’ve decided to do another book advent for this year. As mentioned previously, this isn’t because we’re anti-chocolate advents (he also gets a little chocolate coin) this is because we’re simply book mad in this house and like finding any excuse to add more to his collection.

For those of you interested in doing your own, but are concerned about cost, this doesn’t cost us much at all. We often start collecting the books throughout the year, either by scouring charity shops, garden centres, etc. or looking online at places like The Book People or The Works who often have good deals on book bundles.

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T’s Reads: Alien Nation by Matty Donaldson

This week was National Coming Out Day. If you’ve not heard of it or had your head in the sand for 24 hours, it’s a day to celebrate the coming out of the LGBTQ community (as a member or as an ally). We’ve written our feelings about the day before, which you can find over here.

Founded in the United States in 1988, the initial idea was grounded in the feminist and gay liberation spirit of the personal being political, and the emphasis on the most basic form of activism being coming out to family, friends and colleagues, and living life as an openly lesbian or gay person. The foundational belief is that homophobia thrives in an atmosphere of silence and ignorance, and that once people know that they have loved ones who are lesbian or gay, they are far less likely to maintain homophobic or oppressive views.

Wikipedia

As well as a form of protest, it’s also an opportunity for members of the community to educate others on the language they use and advise others on what they can do to help those still in the proverbial closet.

In keeping with the theme, we were recently sent a children’s book that does this.

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T’s Reads: A Little Box of Books Subscription Box (Review)

Over the past few months we’ve been incredibly lucky to have found a number of new books that included diverse family units as their main characters; as well as talked about a number of topics from prejudice to gender. There was a time when the choice was very sparse or the stories weren’t so much ‘stories’ but more about educating the reader about different families.

These books are still needed of course, but when you’re sat down ready for the bedtime story, all you want to read to your child is a story where they’re included in the tale just like every other child or family.

There are a number of resources we’ve recently found where we can find books that do just this and we’ll be sharing these very soon, as well as an up-to-date list of our favourites titles, but for now I thought I’d tell you about a brand new book subscription service that we’ve recently found that celebrates diversity and families just like us!

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T’s Reads: Mixed: A Colourful Story by Arree Chung

Over the past three years we’ve slowly been collecting an array of books that are inclusive and diverse. We’ve written previously about our list of favourites, however our list is now growing rapidly (we really need to update this list!). Things are certainly changing when it comes to Children’s books!

Every few weeks I scour the web to find new publishers promoting inclusive books as well as keep up to date with those that we already follow on twitter, and every week I’m seeing something new and exciting. Things are moving forward. It makes me smile from ear to ear, when looking at T’s bookshelves, that I can count on two hands the amount of books that now feature diverse families, as well as challenge prejudice.

More recently, we found a book that did just that; challenge prejudice, and I can honestly say it’s one of our favourite books – if not within our Top 3! Continue reading

T’s Reads: What Does a Princess Really Look Like? by Mark Loewen

As two mums raising a son, it’s imperative to us that he grows up knowing that women are equal to men. You could say that we’re raising a little feminist. Therefore, this needs to be reflected early on, whether it’s in the games that we play, the films we watch, and the books we read. I want this to be his normality.

Many years ago, however, things weren’t like this. Girls were treated very differently and certainly weren’t encouraged to do ‘boys’ things. Girl’s aspirations were based around beauty and pretty things. Although my mum raised my sister and I away from this, it was hard when the TV you watched said otherwise.

Going on what the TV said, I certainly was not a Princess.

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T’s Reads: LGBT Books: Two Mums & Two Mums and a Menagerie, by Carolyn Robertson

We’re always on the lookout for books that represent us as a family as we feel it’s important not just for T, so that he doesn’t always feel like a minority, but for society, so that they can accept, and dare I say it, ‘normalise’ us as a family unit.

If you visit your local library or book shop, it’s very rare that you’ll see many stories that show same sex families living every day lives like other stories on the shelves. More often than not, you’ll see books that ‘educate’ readers about different families, but there aren’t many than don’t make a point of the family being a same sex family.

Carolyn Robertson and her partner are adoptive mums to two boys, and began her publishing platform ‘Sparklypoo‘ in 2014 as a way to create books for LGBT adoptive families when she saw that the market was lacking in this subject.

I wanted to create books that were full of colour, fun and humour that would sit alongside all the other books our children enjoyed. Most of all I wanted affirming books that all children could appreciate because the topic of having Two Mums or Dads was simply incidental to the story.

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