Our Favourite Children’s Books about Mental Health and Wellbeing

Today is World Mental Health Day, a day I often like to reflect and think about how far I’ve come in regards to my own mental health. Since coming to terms with it, and understanding that just like any visible or physical injury; where you need to make adjustments due a sudden change, mental health needs to be treated exactly the same way.

On good days I don’t pick my arms, I don’t feel nauseous, and tasks around the home are streamline and effortless. On bad days, well, you get the drift. Over the past few years I’ve been more open and honest about how I’m feeling, and likewise I’ve stopped and really listened to the signs of my mind telling me it’s struggling.

Not only that, one of the other benefits to addressing and taking control of my own mental health is now being able to recognise when others are struggling – primarily friends, but especially my family. Sharon and I haven’t always been the best at expressing, but now that we have a child we’ve become a lot better at expressing ourselves as well as inviting T to express how he’s feeling. This is now amplified now that T has started school which often comes with waves of emotions and awkward social situations.

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Rainbow Revolutions: Power, Pride and Protest [Gift]

Last month, we were sent Rainbow Revolutions: Power, Pride and Protest, a new book by Jamie Lawson and illustrated by Eve Lloyd Knight. A book about LGBTQ history, dating back as far as 1790. Although we’re the living result of LGBTQ History, we still don’t know it all, and we never want to stop learning either. This book helps me and my community do just that.

Unlike most moments in history that carved our children’s future – I use heroes like Emily Pankhurst and Martin Luther King Jr as example – and despite having a rich history, LGBTQ-specific history is so rarely spoken about and referenced. This is partly to do with ignorance and a lack of respect for our community, but it’s also because a lot of the time people are unaware of the contributions LGBTQ people had on history.

Did you know that Alan Turing – father of modern computing and all-time war hero – was Gay and later chemically castrated for being so? Also, in the 1940’s, when Nazi Germany was beaten and survivors of the Holocaust were rescued, people with LGBTQ identities were transferred from the concentration camps, where they were tortured and almost died, to a prison to continue a life-long sentence for being LGBTQ because it was illegal to be LGBTQ in Germany.

These are just a handful of stories featured in the Rainbow Revolutions, but there’s more. Here’s my review and why you NEED this book on your book shelf.

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How to Build an LGBTQ-friendly Library for your Children

Before T was even born, Sharon and I were talking about our favourite books and what kind of books T would likely have on his shelves. Classics like; Guess How Much I Love You, Spot, and Goodnight Moon were all up there, but, very quickly, we realised that families like us were rarely represented in children’s books.

At first it was pretty easy to navigate around, we would perhaps change the odd “mum” to a “dad” so that there were two dads in a story, or visa versa; replacing the odd “dad” with a “mama”. But as time went on, or when T started wanting to look at the pictures in the books and subsequently challenging our choice in character, we realised we had to expand our library to make sure he was represented, not to mention show him a fair representation of society!

We already had a few diverse and inclusive books in our collection, but no where near enough LGBTQ books – we needed more.

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The Moonlite Projector: Review [AD – Review]

Books are incredibly important in our house. Not only do they allow us to explore new worlds and meet new people, but they bring us together as a family. Not a day goes by when we don’t read T a book.

Bedtime is when we read most of our books; although I don’t begrudge T when he brings me a book after breakfast! When we’re settling down for the night, T will usually sneak 2-3 books to bed hoping we’ll read all three (we always do) and then ask for another. I love the fact that he finishes his day with a book – I often wonder whether his story continues in his dreams.

T is a complete book worm, and to celebrate World Book Day we were recently sent a new interactive reading experience: a Moonlite Projector.

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T’s Reads: Book Advent Calendar 2018 – Week Four & (Cheap) Places to Find Books!

By the time you’re reading this, it’s likely to be Christmas Day (or later! Thanks for reading, anyway!) and our Book Advent will be over. Just like last year, we’ve had fun finding new books for T and hope to continue this for years to come. As he gets older though, story books may become puzzle books or maybe even something for school, but either way it’s something that we hope to continue for at least a few more years. 

Week four was quite a short one, with the last few days seeing only three new books, but we were lucky in that a few of our favourites were saved ’til last. Here’s what we found on week three, and stick around until the end as I’ve shared a couple of our favourite places where we find affordable books for T.

If you’d like to find out what we read on week three you can find this here.

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T’s Reads: Book Advent Calendar 2018 – Week Three

Just like the rest of the world, I cannot believe how fast December has gone. I thought having a lot of our Christmas shopping done early December would have meant December would have been a bit more chilled, but alas, the month clearly has other plans! 

This is probably the last time where we will see a full week of Book Advents, as the following week we’ll only have three more days until Christmas! But not to worry, I’ll have something extra for our last week to go with our last remaining books.

If you haven’t read what we found last week, you can read about this here.

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