Rainbow Revolutions: Power, Pride and Protest [Gift]

Last month, we were sent Rainbow Revolutions: Power, Pride and Protest, a new book by Jamie Lawson and illustrated by Eve Lloyd Knight. A book about LGBTQ history, dating back as far as 1790. Although we’re the living result of LGBTQ History, we still don’t know it all, and we never want to stop learning either. This book helps me and my community do just that.

Unlike most moments in history that carved our children’s future – I use heroes like Emily Pankhurst and Martin Luther King Jr as example – and despite having a rich history, LGBTQ-specific history is so rarely spoken about and referenced. This is partly to do with ignorance and a lack of respect for our community, but it’s also because a lot of the time people are unaware of the contributions LGBTQ people had on history.

Did you know that Alan Turing – father of modern computing and all-time war hero – was Gay and later chemically castrated for being so? Also, in the 1940’s, when Nazi Germany was beaten and survivors of the Holocaust were rescued, people with LGBTQ identities were transferred from the concentration camps, where they were tortured and almost died, to a prison to continue a life-long sentence for being LGBTQ because it was illegal to be LGBTQ in Germany.

These are just a handful of stories featured in the Rainbow Revolutions, but there’s more. Here’s my review and why you NEED this book on your book shelf.

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Our Top List of LGBTQ Blogs and Influencers in the UK (SO FAR!)

It’s not an exaggeration when I say that I could probably count on one hand the amount of times I have seen an LGBTQ person or family feature in a brand campaign. I’m not talking about your big adverts like Gillete or IKEA (although they’re still very welcome!) or famous LGBTQ celebrities, I’m talking about families like mine  – people like me – in local campaigns. LGBTQ Blogs.

We’re simply too divisive or not as “popular” because we’re a bit niche. But the thing is, it’s because we’re a bit niche that we’re actually incredibly valuable. We’re a peek into what society really looks like today and we’re your way into making yourself more diverse and inclusive.

With this in mind, over the past few years, I’ve spent a lot of time increasing the visibility of families like mine and, in general, people like me. Online and in the media. I’ve challenged brands that aren’t up to scratch – both publicly and via email – and I’ve had really productive conversations with those in control of connecting influencers and bloggers with brands, asking why members of the LGBTQ community aren’t being put forward or represented.

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Brighton Pride 2018: Why Pride is still important.

Over the past thirty-something years, I’ve been ‘proud’ of many things. I was proud when I got a few A’s in my GCSE’s (I know, I was surprised, too), I was proud when I passed my driving test, I was proud when I lost a lot of weight whilst trying for a baby, and more recently, I was proud when I conquered my fear of open heights.

Pride isn’t just about being proud of yourself either, you can be proud of your friends, family, and colleagues. Your neighbours, your congregation, your country. Pride has so much power behind it. It can empower people and celebrate a community. There is nothing wrong with being proud, however when used in the wrong way it can blind one’s viewpoint.

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A Letter to the Marketing Team of…

Dear Marketing Team,

It’s Pride season!

I probably don’t need to tell you this though, you’ve probably had it in your calendars since January, if not since last Pride. You’ve got your rainbow flags sat in storage ready to adorn the float you plan to place on the Pride parade, you’ve got your hashtags at the ready, posts scheduled, and maybe a few rainbow themed products already on the shelves of your local supermarket. You are ready to celebrate Pride!

But, as always, you’ve forgotten one important thing; the meaning behind Pride.

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How To Be An LGBT Ally As A Business. 

Every year when the Pride season officially starts, there’s an influx of adverts from brands and companies detailing how they’re “Officially Supporting Pride“. From streams of Facebook posts showing same sex couples holding hands and using the brand’s product, to novelty items where everything from bottles to burgers have been dyed rainbow colour. There aren’t many companies out there now that aren’t jumping on the Rainbow band wagon during Pride season.

Don’t get me wrong, plenty of brands get it right. From Skittles who started promoting their support for the LGBT community long before Pride season began, to IKEA who aired one of the first same sex couples in one of their commercials.

Thanks #Skittles. #LGBT

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However, there are still a high percentage of businesses that take complete advantage, and when you look closely at some, they couldn’t be further from the meaning behind Pride. Some folks over on Twitter have even taken it upon themselves to challenge companies by asking them exactly how much they’ve donated to Pride or LGBT charities during Pride season.

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Days Out: Pride 2016

Last weekend we went to Brighton Pride for our umpteenth time and T’s second time. T was only 4 months old when we went last year.

Typically, T had to be woken up, even though 5:45 was his usual time throughout the week – he clearly didn’t know what was ahead of him. Once we were all washed, dressed, and rainbow’ed up to our eyeballs we were ready. We were so excited.


Arriving a little too early at Hove Lawns, we decided to go get breakfast at a local beach side cafe. During this time, it wasn’t long before we started spotting rainbows and glittery floats. The weather was absolutely gorgeous. We all started getting a little bit excited.

This year, we decided to join in the Pride parade alongside Brighton and Hove rainbow families. We’ve been part of this group for some time via Facebook, although we’ve never found the time to meet up officially (something we’re going to rectify soon). Even if you’re new, the group is always so welcoming, and has a wonderful array of families as members; from two mum families, two dad families, to co-parenting families. It was actually quite a sight to see so many rainbow families in one place. I was actually quite sad at the thought of then having to go home where we’re very much the only rainbow family within a 5 mile radius.

At 11:00 the parade officially started, samba bands and all. This was T’s cue to fall asleep and not wake until we reached Preston Park.

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The parade was fantastic, with a real buzz to it. Everywhere we looked we saw smiling faces and waving from onlookers. The younger children in the group enjoyed high-fiving people as they passed, where as the older children enjoyed dancing on the float. It was a real party.

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Arriving at Preston Park at around 12:45, some 18,000 steps later, we made our way to the family area to meet up with friends and families who we hadn’t seen since the previous year. This bit is like a massive reunion where we chat and swap stories about the past year – commenting on how our little ones are no longer so little.

Located a further back in comparison to last year, which was a shame as we like watching the being a part of the main park as well, I noticed that there was a lot more room for the children to run around this year. Plus, we also had exclusive access to the massive play park within Preston Park. This will be perfect for T in years to come.

After a little sit down and a fruit picnic, we grabbed some lunch; I had a mountain of nachos and S had a rather large Bratwurst (pardon). Although we packed T a lunch, he also helped himself to our lunches.

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Walking around the main park is my favourite part by far. The people, the music, the stalls. Everything about it reminds me why I love our community so much. Everything is so colourful, and everyone is here to have a good time. Now that the organisers charge to get into the park, it means people who do attend are there for the right reasons, and not solely to get drunk and rowdy. It meant the atmosphere was safe for T to have a little wonder, have a little dance, and get a few cuddles from passers by.

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Despite being robbed blind when it came to drinks and food prices we quickly got into the spirit of things. We enjoyed ice cream in front of the women’s tent, drank Pimms with the bears, and chatted about joining the Girl Guides. We had a wonderful time.

Pride for us is only going to get better the more T starts to understand what it’s all about. Over the next few years it’s going to be one giant carnival party for him, and thats ok. I can’t wait, however, to explain one day how far Pride has come and why it’s so important. I can’t wait for him to look forward to the Pride weekend and to meeting up with his friends.

This post really doesn’t do our day justice. It really was a fantastic day and I was sad to see it end. Although I nursed a baby wearing hangover for the majority of Saturday night and Sunday morning, it was totally worth it.

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